May 10

IIFB-SBSTTA 20- Invasive Species

INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS FORUM ON BIODIVERSITY

STATEMENT ON AGENDA ITEM 5

INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES: ADDRESSING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH TRADE; BIOLOGICAL CONTROL; AND DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS

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Mr/Madam Chair,

I am speaking on behalf of the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB).

We thank the Secretariat for preparing the documents in relation to Invasive Alien Species.

We welcome this opportunity to share our perspectives on these very critical issues that can have a devastating effect on the livelihoods of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities and in particular the biological control of invasive alien species.

Indigenous peoples and local communities have ownership, occupation, management, or control of around 20% of lands globally and we welcome the approach to use the precautionary principle as the basis for all decisions on the release of biological control agents.

The cost financially, environmentally on the biological diversity and ecosystems and culturally to effectively manage or eradicate the invasive alien species is an enormous burden to Parties, other Governments, relevant organisations, and Indigenous peoples and local communities with significant effect on designated environmentally sensitive or protected areas as well as on human use (eg. Water quality, recreational uses, tourism, animal grazing, hunting, and fishing).

The IIFB draws SBSTTA’s attention to the Guidelines for Assessing the Risk of Non-native Animals Becoming Invasive developed by the World Organisation for Animal Health and the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures produced by IPCC, both of which provide standards for risk assessment process on pests or non-native animals, and indicate to consider direct and indirect consequences that are highly relevant to Indigenous peoples and local communities in the risk assessment processes. These standards include consideration on the consequence in the environment or socio-cultural values. Failure in assessing risks on these could have substantial impacts on the livelihood, food sources, and the social and cultural well-being of Indigenous peoples and local communities.

  • The IIFB therefore recommends that the suggested recommendation paragraph 10 should be broadened, taking into account the inputs from Indigenous peoples and local communities, with regard to identification of, and assessing risks and the impacts posed by invasive alien species on their livelihood and socio-cultural values; human health and well-being; as well as gaps in risk assessment and risk management for the use of biological control agents against invasive alien species.

As well, in the decision support tools, it is critical to engage Indigenous peoples and local communities to use their knowledge, innovations and practices for the management of invasive alien species. Indigenous peoples and local communities have also established economic enterprises to support their livelihood and the impacts of invasive alien species can be devastating to their independence.

Indigenous peoples and local communities should be instrumental in the management, monitoring and regulation of invasive alien species with appropriate education and training in controlled or eradication measures to manage pathways to control invasive alien species. It is essential that Indigenous peoples and local communities who have adapted to rely on some of these invasive alien species for food sources is engaged in these processes.

  • The IIFB would therefore recommend in accordance with the CBD Article 8(j), that Indigenous peoples and local communities are engaged to participate in the compilation or development of decision support tools, and the development of the technical guide for conducting cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis for the management of invasive alien species.

Thank you Mr/Madam Chair

May 10

IIFB-SBSTTA 20- Item 4 Marine and Coastal Biodiversity

INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS FORUM ON BIODIVERSITY

STATEMENT ON AGENDA ITEM 4

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The IIFB first acknowledges the traditional people of this place, the Kanien Keha; ka, members of the Haudenosaunee, keepers of the eastern door. We thank their senior members past, present and future, for their custodianship.

This statement is made on behalf of the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB). For all of us, the conservation of marine – coastal ecosystems and its biodiversity is vital, since these resources are the reservoirs so important for the food security of humanity, each day we see these ecosystems and their resources are being threatened by pollution and overexploitation.
Evidently IPLC, including indigenous women, have been contributing to the conservation of marine and coastal ecosystems and its biodiversity for time immemorial.
Many marine areas of ecological and biological importance are in the ancestral territories of indigenous peoples and local communities, and their role in these areas are indispensable.
As indigenous peoples and local communities we have some comments:

  1. The participation of indigenous peoples and local communities in the regional workshops for describing ecologically or biologically significant marine areas (EBSAs), has been very limited or absent and, for this reason, we request to increase the effective participation of indigenous peoples and local communities in future workshops related to this work.
  2. It is essential to ensure the full and effective participation of indigenous peoples and local communities, including indigenous women and youth, particularly when addressing traditional knowledge and continued practices

Mr chair

On the linkages with other relevant international agreements;

Its important to consider the IPLC reliance on the sustainable use of marine resources for their livelihoods. The IIFB therefore recommend changes to the suggested recommendation 3(c).

Suggested recommendation.

Given their direct relevance, we encourage parties to include explicit reference in para 3(c) to FAO’s Voluntary Guidelines on the responsible governance of tenure of land, fisheries and forests and voluntary guidelines for securing sustainable small-scale fisheries.

In regards to recommendation 6, in order to achieve the objectives of ensuring the marine and coastal resources for future generations is crucial taking in to account the indigenous peoples participation, because, based on their traditional knowledge they have succeeded to conserve the marine and coastal ecosystem.

Therefore, IIFB recommends that separate regional workshops for indigenous peoples and local communities are organised to address the contributions of indigenous traditional knowledge in the conservation and use of marine – coastal resources, ecosystems and biodiversity. Similarly supporting cultural practices associated with livelihoods ensures that indigenous traditional knowledge systems are maintained and can play a role in the management and sustainable use of marine biological resources.

Many thanks

May 10

IIFB-SBSTTA 20- Agenda Item 3- Scientific Review of the Strategic Plan

INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS FORUM ON BIODIVERSITY

STATEMENT ON AGENDA ITEM 3

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Scientific review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and related programmes of work and the achievement of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

Esteemed Chairperson of the Meeting,and Distinguished Delegates of SBSTTA 20

This statement is made on behalf of the International Indigenous Forum On Biodiversity (IIFB).

As noted, the document UNEP/CBD/SBSTTA20/2 has focused its consideration on progress in the implementation of Target 11 on protected areas, and had not yet fully considered how the scientific review of the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and related programmes of work will be carried out.

In this statement, IIFB wishes to put forward specific recommendations on Target 11 and will review the Agenda items under SBSTTA20 and SBI1 to identify where to forward specific recommendations with respect to the scientific review of the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity with a focus on Aichi Target 18.

VII.      Suggested RECOMMENDATIONS

  1. Invites Parties:

ADD: “(c)bis To ensure, including through participatory community mapping and clarification of community protocols, that all new or expanded protected and conserved areas do not encroach into or overlap with indigenous peoples’ and community conserved territories and areas, sacred sites or indigenous peoples’ customary territories without the full and effective participation and free, prior and informed consent of the indigenous peoples and local communities.”

  1. Invites relevant partners, indigenous peoples and local communities regional agencies, bilateral and multilateral funding agencies, in collaboration with the Executive Secretary:
  • To develop further guidance on:

ADD (iii)(bis)  Equitable governance and management, taking into account work being undertaken under Article 8(j) on the implementation of priority task 3 (on customary sustainable use and protected areas) under the Plan of Action on Customary Sustainable Use;

IIFB requests Parties to consider these recommendations in the SBSTTA20 proposals on this matter.

Mar 15

IIFB- WG8j9- Declaration on the INFORMED CONSENT

WG8j9

Indigenous Peoples, we reaffirm our status as such, are the holders of traditional knowledge, based on the right of ownership of our ancestral territories, and thus access to traditional knowledge, they must follow the rules and principles based on customary laws.

Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) should be binding, and further developed through the creation of a group of indigenous experts. According to the decisions and guidelines of several organizations of United Nations System, FPIC should be the principle established for access to traditional knowledge instead of PIC.

The granting of free and informed consent, does not involve negotiation or granting intellectual property rights to third party users and licenses for the use and access to traditional knowledge. The ownership of traditional knowledge is for indigenous peoples, who have guarded for millennia through their customary laws and through their own governments. In this sense, competition for granting prior informed consent must be deposited in the legitimate and traditional authorities.

 

As for the distribution of profits proposed guidelines should not be limited to Bon guide or the Annex of the Nagoya Protocol, but these must also include safeguards to their traditional land rights and resources. We emphasize that the right to fair and equitable sharing should also contemplate cultural and spiritual elements of indigenous peoples.

As misuse and repatriation of traditional knowledge, it must include the return of objects including our traditional knowledge and relevant information, also considering compensation, compensation and restoration for the misuse of traditional knowledge. Therefore, the development of bio-cultural community protocols and should include proper procedures based on uses and customs of indigenous peoples.

Capacity building is key to compliance with prior informed consent element, the fair and equitable sharing of benefits, and to prevent the misuse of traditional knowledge.

Mar 15

Declaración sobre el Consentimiento Fundamento Previo

WG8J9

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Los Pueblos indígenas, reiteramos en nuestra condición de tales, somos los titulares del conocimiento tradicional, fundamentado en el derecho de propiedad ancestral de nuestros territorios, y por lo tanto para el acceso de los conocimientos tradicionales, éstas deben seguir las normas y principios basados en las leyes consuetudinarias.

El Consentimiento libre previo e informado (CLPI), debe ser de cumplimiento obligatorio, y desarrollado aún más a través de la conformación de un Grupo de Expertos Indígenas. De acuerdo a las decisiones y directrices de varios organismos del Sistema de las Naciones Unidas, el CLPI debe ser el principio establecido para el acceso a los conocimientos tradicionales en lugar del consentimiento fundamentado previo.

El otorgamiento del consentimiento previo libre e informado, no implica negociación, ni la concesión de licencias y derechos de propiedad intelectual a los terceros usuarios, por el uso y acceso al conocimiento tradicional. La titularidad del conocimiento tradicional corresponde a los pueblos indígenas, que han custodiado milenariamente por medio de sus leyes consuetudinarias y a través de sus gobiernos propios. En tal sentido, la competencia para el otorgamiento del consentimiento libre previo e informado debe estar depositado en las autoridades legítimas y tradicionales.

En cuanto a la distribución de beneficios las directrices propuestas no deben limitarse a las guías de Bon, ni al anexo del Protocolo de Nagoya, sino que estas además deben incluir las salvaguardas a los derechos territoriales y sus recursos tradicionales. Enfatizamos que el derecho a la distribución justa y equitativa debe contemplar igualmente elementos culturales y espirituales de los pueblos indígenas.

En cuanto al uso indebido y la repatriación de los conocimientos tradicionales, ésta debe incluir la repatriación de los objetos que incluyen nuestros conocimientos tradicionales así como la información pertinente, considerando también la indemnización, compensación y la restauración por el uso indebido de los conocimientos tradicionales. Por consiguiente, el desarrollo de los Protocolos bioculturales y comunitarios deben incluir procedimientos propios, basados en usos y costumbre de los pueblos indígenas.

El desarrollo de capacidades es un elemento fundamental para el cumplimiento del consentimiento libre previo e informado, la distribución justa y equitativa de los beneficios, así como para prevenir el uso indebido de los conocimientos tradicionales.

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